Tag Archives: solvent recycling

Hurricane Harvey Aftermath Part II: Acetone Shortage

The petrochemical industry was severely impacted when Hurricane Harvey struck the Gulf in August. In the wake of that disaster, we're now left to pick up the pieces and assess the extent of the damage throughout the region—including rising costs solvents like acetone. Here's what we're finding out, and how Solvent Recycling Systems can help:…
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Where can I find a MEK solvent alternative?

What is MEK solvent? Looking for a MEK solvent alternative? It's important to first understand its chemical properties. MEK solvent is 100% pure butanone, or MEK, short for Methyl Ethyl Ketone, is a solvent for thinning specified coatings – particularly gums, resins, cellulose acetate and nitrocellulose coatings, and vinyl films. MEK is widely used in industrial manufacturing applications, for example in the…
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Hurricane Harvey Aftermath: Why Solvent Recycling is Mission Critical

Hurricane Harvey wiped away 40% of the nation's supply of ethylene, arguably the world's most important petrochemical. Solvent recycling is needed now more than ever. A once-in-a-1,000-year flood across the Gulf of Mexico is proving to have ramifications on the entire world. Before Hurricane Harvey began its destructive path through Texas and Louisiana, ethylene, a…
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Affordable MEK solvent recycling

What is MEK solvent? 100% pure butanone, or MEK, short for Methyl Ethyl Ketone, is a solvent for thinning specified coatings – particularly gums, resins, cellulose acetate and nitrocellulose coatings, and vinyl films. MEK is widely used in industrial manufacturing applications, for example in the manufacture of plastics, textiles, and paraffin wax. It can be utilized as a plastic bonding agent that…
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Mineral Spirits vs Paint Thinner – what’s the difference?

What is the difference between mineral spirits vs paint thinner? Mineral spirits are a type of solvent typically used for parts cleaning and machine washing. A petroleum distillate, mineral spirits are often used as a substitute for turpentine, and tend to build up grease and grime. Mineral spirits also include thin oil-based materials such as varnishes. Paint thinner, in…
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Recycle Your Mineral Spirits with IoT Solvent Recyclers

Did you know you can recycle and reclaim your contaminated paint thinner? Paint thinner, also known as mineral spirits, can all be reused over and over again to clean oil-based paints and stains. Mineral spirits, a petroleum distillate,  are often used as a substitute for turpentine. They are less flammable and toxic than turpentine, but…
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Can I recycle toluene solvent?

Yes. Solvent Recycling Systems can recover toluene solvent from previously spent solvents. What is toluene? Toluene is an organic solvent that has the chemical formula C7H8 that belongs to the aromatic hydrocarbon family. Toluene is a common ingredient in degreasers and is used as a solvent in many applications including rubber, ink, paint, adhesives, and…
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Solvent Recycling Lowers Cannabis Testing Equipment Costs

Addressing "Process Validation" Bottlenecks in Cannabis Testing  For the industry pioneers using cannabis testing equipment, being green is a challenge. Medical cannabis is legal in half the country, but many producers are struggling to navigate the new testing and licensure requirements. Regulators have created a system that positions the processing lab as the powerful gatekeepers that…
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Common FAQs of the Solvent Recovery Process

There is a lot to digest when it comes to the solvent recovery or recycling process. What type of solvent recycler should I choose? What overhead costs in addition to the still should I be concerned about? How much time will I need to devote to an operations team? We'll seek to answer the most common…
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What is a spent solvent and why is it valuable?

A spent solvent is a type of spent material, which is defined by the EPA as "any material that has been used and as a result of contamination can no longer serve the purpose for which it was produced without processing." Under the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), you must adequately determine if the…
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