Tag Archives: mineral spirits

How Do I Recycle Mineral Spirits Klean Strips?

Whether you’re working with paint, varnish, stain or epoxy, mineral spirits Klean Strips are an excellent line of solvents and thinners for project clean-up, allowing you to work faster and perform better. But did you know that these solvents and paint thinners can be recycled and reused on-site in your facility, over and over, resulting…
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A primer on mineral spirit uses

Mineral spirit uses are widespread. But how do the solvents compare, and how do you properly select one vs. the other? First, let's separate the solvents into the petroleum distillates. Because the most highly used mineral spirits are petroleum distillates, this reduces the remaining products to a number that’s easy to handle. Petroleum distillates are all…
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Mineral Spirits vs Paint Thinner – what’s the difference?

What is the difference between mineral spirits vs paint thinner? Mineral spirits are a type of solvent typically used for parts cleaning and machine washing. A petroleum distillate, mineral spirits are often used as a substitute for turpentine, and tend to build up grease and grime. Mineral spirits also include thin oil-based materials such as varnishes. Paint thinner, in…
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Mineral spirits as a degreaser

Maintaining a low-cost and sustainable operation for your degreaser is of vital importance in the effort to offset rising production facility costs. Solvent Recycling Systems can recycle mineral spirits used as a degreaser, including D-Limonene, Paint thinners and Naptha solvent, in addition to other hydrocarbon solvents used for parts washing. Solvent Recycling Systems uses state-of-the-solvent distillation machines…
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Recycle Your Mineral Spirits with IoT Solvent Recyclers

Did you know you can recycle and reclaim your contaminated paint thinner? Paint thinner, also known as mineral spirits, can all be reused over and over again to clean oil-based paints and stains. Mineral spirits, a petroleum distillate,  are often used as a substitute for turpentine. They are less flammable and toxic than turpentine, but…
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